Tag Archives: asset management

 

Mining and metals companies are implementing a range of strategies to enhance asset management and equipment reliability.

In today’s market, many senior executives leading natural resource companies hesitate in making additional capital investment and instead focus on what can be done to squeeze higher performance out of current assets. Consequently, companies are increasingly looking for ways to improve performance and returns with existing infrastructure.

The key approach to this challenge lies in upgrading and improving asset management capabilities. Many organizations have failed to deploy optimal asset management practices. This is surprising given that asset spend frequently represents 30% to 50% of the overall operating expenses. Shifting to a best-in-class asset management program will consistently deliver improved plant or equipment performance, lower operating costs, extend asset life, and generate a higher return on capital. Most recently, companies have sought to implement a range of strategies such as:

  1. Implementing Asset Management Systems: Utilizing robust asset management systems to track equipment performance, maintenance history, and lifecycle costs, allowing for better decision-making regarding repairs, replacements, and upgrades. Digital technologies like IoT sensors, AI-driven analytics, and automation further optimize asset management.
  2. Enhancing Maintenance Practices: Implementing proactive maintenance strategies like conditioned-based monitoring and reliability-centered maintenance to address issues before they cause failures. Utilizing data-driven insights, mining companies can optimize “time on tools” by identifying patterns and trends in equipment usage, maintenance needs, and performance. This allows for more precise scheduling of maintenance tasks, reducing downtime and maximizing the time equipment is operational.
  3. Investing in Training: Providing comprehensive training programs for front-line management, maintenance and operations personnel to ensure equipment is used and serviced properly, reducing the likelihood of breakdowns due to human error and that access to equipment is available. Training personnel to utilize data-driven insights enables management to make informed decisions impacting “time on tools” and leading to improved equipment utilization and overall operational performance.
  4. Improving Supply Chain Management: Ensuring timely access to quality spare parts and materials to minimize downtime caused by equipment breakdowns and repairs. Some are adopting blockchain for transparent supply chain management and better tracking of assets throughout their lifecycle.

The level of performance improvement companies can realize by implementing key strategies such as enhancing proactive maintenance practices, investing in training to improve skills and capabilities, improving supply chain management, and leveraging digital technologies and data-driven insights varies depending upon factors like current operational efficiency, the scale of implementation, and industry conditions. However, many can expect significant improvements in:

  1. Safety: Proper training programs and proactive maintenance strategies contribute to a safe work environment by reducing risk of accidents and equipment failures.
  2. Productivity: Proactive maintenance and digital technologies can reduce downtime, increase equipment availability, and optimize process execution, leading to higher productivity levels.
  3. Cost Reduction: Efficient equipment usage and maintenance practices can lower operational costs by minimizing unplanned downtime, reducing repair and replacement expenses, and optimizing resource utilization.
  4. Quality: Improving the essential management skills and work place practices result improve the quality of maintenance execution.

Overall, these strategies can result in substantial performance improvements, enhancing competitiveness and profitability for mining and metals companies.

USC Consulting Group partners with your organization and coaches your people to significantly impact performance outcomes and accelerate Asset Management and Reliability Excellence.

USC’s experience helping clients to shift asset performance by transforming and optimizing asset management capabilities and processes has repeatedly demonstrated the need to focus on the key levers and enablers to asset management and reliability excellence. Our asset management framework is designed to be pragmatic rather than conceptual, thereby leading to accurate, practical decisions about a client’s assets and aspirational outcomes.

The primary goal of USC’s asset management framework is to help our clients to implement and execute of a robust set of integrated processes and tools to manage and maintain their operational assets at the targeted service levels while optimizing life-cycle costs and asset life. This is accomplished by recognizing the needs to:

Our asset management and reliability framework helps clients identify an organization’s asset management maturity level and the areas and gaps that need to be addressed, by evaluating their strategic, tactical and operational levers and the enablers that comprise each.

Asset Management Triangle

Strategic (Lifecycle Management): A tailored maintenance program for each piece of equipment translates overall strategic objectives into executable plans for equipment upkeep. Our framework helps to structure and prioritize critical assets while defining a baseline operational ‘plan of action’ by determining strategies for maintaining equipment based on analysis of equipment capabilities, required performance levels, failure frequencies, and cost objectives. Optimal maintenance strategies are frequently a blend of preventative, predictive, operator-maintained, and run-to-fail options.

Tactical (Business Processes): Business processes bridge the gaps between the initial, ideal plan and the reality of ‘day-to-day’ operations, so the maintenance and reliability organization can make adjustments. Historically, many maintenance organizations have been poor utilizers of labor resources that result in low “time on tools” and excessive delays in repairing down or poor performing equipment.

Operational (Enablers): Enablers help to identify needed support to manage assets throughout their lifecycle in alignment with organizational aspirations. Leading asset management teams have also made changes in their organization structures and management practices to foster more action-oriented leadership that focuses on operational excellence, which usually requires a culture shift that must be relentlessly supported by the leadership team over the long-term. A heavy emphasis on management behaviors and company culture can help organizations make this difficult transition.

USC Helps You Tackle Key Challenges

Do you want to understand how prepared your company is to drive needed asset performance and reliability improvements and what the key focus areas that will contribute to lower operating costs?

Want to find out more about how USC can help you uncover the hidden value lurking in asset portfolio?

For more information, let’s talk it through with a no obligation video conference call or a meeting with one of our executive team. Email info@usccg.com to arrange a call.

How to Improve Asset Management and Equipment Performance to Enhance Reliability CTA

Back to top ↑

 

In the dynamic realm of industrial operations, downtime is the arch-nemesis of productivity and profitability. Every minute lost to equipment breakdowns or maintenance activities translates into potential revenue losses, increased operating costs, and compromised competitiveness. Amidst this relentless pursuit of operational efficiency, the emergence of low or no maintenance industrial machinery heralds a transformative era for industries worldwide.

High maintenance equipment has long been a staple in industrial settings, requiring regular servicing, lubrication, and part replacements to ensure optimal performance. However, the inherent drawbacks of such machinery, including frequent downtime, escalating maintenance costs, and operational disruptions, have spurred a quest for alternative solutions.

Enter low or no maintenance industrial machinery—an innovation poised to revolutionize the industrial landscape. Engineered with durability, reliability, and longevity in mind, these advanced systems promise to mitigate the adverse effects of downtime and high maintenance requirements, ushering in a new era of seamless operations and cost savings.

The detrimental effects of downtime on industrial productivity cannot be overstated. Whether due to unexpected breakdowns or scheduled maintenance activities, every moment of idle machinery translates into lost production opportunities and diminished output. Moreover, the ripple effects of downtime extend beyond immediate financial implications, impacting supply chain dynamics, customer satisfaction, and overall business resilience.

In contrast, low or no maintenance components, equipment, and machinery offer a beacon of hope for industries grappling with the specter of downtime. By incorporating self-lubricating mechanisms, wear-resistant materials, and advanced monitoring technologies, these innovative solutions minimize the need for frequent maintenance interventions and extend operational uptime.

The benefits of adopting low or no maintenance industrial machinery are manifold. Beyond the immediate gains in productivity and cost savings, these systems promote a culture of efficiency, sustainability, and resilience within industrial ecosystems. By reducing reliance on traditional maintenance practices, industries can reallocate resources towards value-added endeavors, enhance worker safety, and contribute to environmental stewardship efforts.

In this infographic from FLEXIM, we delve into the profound impacts of downtime and high maintenance equipment on industrial operations, while illuminating the transformative potential of low or no maintenance machinery. Through compelling visuals and insightful analyses, we aim to empower industries with the knowledge and tools needed to navigate the evolving landscape of industrial maintenance and usher in a new era of efficiency and prosperity.

To learn more about best practices for asset management and reducing downtime, contact us to connect with our subject matter experts.

Back to top ↑

 

The 2024 forecasts for the oil and gas industry include some conflicting speculation about supply and demand. It’s leading to confusion for U.S. companies… not to mention dismay as people everywhere scowl at the gas pump when they’re filling up.

Reuters reported in August that OPEC+ expects to see supply cuts that impact oil inventories, which will drive prices potentially higher than the $88 per barrel of crude in August 2023, the highest price since January. OPEC+ is confident, however, that demand will rise markedly.

But… the International Energy Association (IEA) doesn’t quite agree with those numbers, noting that the fluctuating economy will impact manufacturing businesses, and coupled with the tsunami of electric vehicles, will shake out in the form of falling demand.

Those clear-as-mud speculations boil down to one thing: Uncertainty is ahead for an industry that has already had its fair share.

All industries have been weathering uncertainty for the past few years, starting with the pandemic and, once we thought we had that handled, continuing with a shaky economy, a cried-wolf recession and ever-rising interest rates, putting consumer confidence on shifting sands.

At USC Consulting Group, we specialize in helping companies through uncertain times by optimizing their processes, becoming as efficient as possible and positioning themselves on solid ground to handle whatever is coming down the pike.

Preparing the Oil & Gas industry for an uncertain 2024

Here are seven ways the oil and gas industry can shore up for an uncertain 2024. Though separate goals, all work together to make companies as efficient and productive as they can be.

1. Reducing costs

Is there ever a year when companies in any industry shouldn’t focus on reducing costs? That’s a given, 24/7/365. But, it’s especially important for oil and gas going into 2024, when the economy continues to be volatile and uncertain. Buttoning up costs is a good strategy for the industry to get through that storm. It’s about optimizing production processes in the field and reducing extraction costs in order to offset costs involved in finding new sites.

2. Managing supply chain risks

After the supply chain bottlenecks most every industry experienced during the pandemic, it’s vital to mitigate supply chain risks. It’s a burr under the saddle of the entire industry. Fluctuating costs and supply uncertainty can impact the entire operation. Oil and gas companies need a little breathing room, predictable lead times and a more secure footing going into next year. Securing your supply chain is one way to achieve that. It can help avoid the market roller coaster we’ve seen in the recent past and may help ease pressure from inflation as well. The bonus here is, it can save about 15% on costs.

Developing a solid risk assessment plan that takes into consideration what’s happening at the supplier level will secure your supply chain and prevent any surprise shortages.

3. Focusing on yield

Maximizing yield, like reducing costs and managing supply chain risks, brings solid benefits in any economy, but especially now. It means making sure extraction techniques are as efficient as possible, utilizing methods like Enhanced Oil Recovery to extract more oil from reservoirs that may have been underutilized, managing those reservoirs carefully and by the numbers, and making sure employees across all facilities are on the same page.

4. Closing the how-why gap

In an organization the front line often does not understand the “why,” and the executives don’t understand the “how.” It means, the top brass do not fully understand how the job gets done and the frontline workers don’t fully understand why the job needs to be done. Closing that “how-why gap” is critical for optimal performance all the way up and down the organizational food chain.

5. Standardizing daily and weekly instructions for front-line managers

Going hand in hand with closing that how-why gap is increased training for managers. Many industries like oil and gas rely on frontline training, but some people would say that supervisors need even more. Training trickles down, but efficiency does, too. And the key to that is making sure everyone, across all departments and facilities, is on the same page, doing the job the same way, with a standard set of operating procedures. It’s a vital component for optimal efficiency.

6. Consolidation and acquisition = increased need for communication

New talent, ideas and perspectives can breathe life into a company. Mergers and acquisitions in the oil and gas industry exploded in Q2 2023, according to Enverus Intelligence Research. After $8 billion M&A in Q1 2023 (nothing to sneeze at) we saw $24b in Q2. It’s in line with increased consolidations, as reported by Forbes, with the goal of lowering costs, raising inventory and in the end, boosting investor returns.

All of that M&A activity can put a strain on employees of affected companies. Especially during this flurry of M&A, it’s important to find solutions to help them with the complexities of combining two “legacy” groups, which have their unique set of standards. Finding ways to combine both schools of thought into one set of “best practices” after a merger is paramount to its success. To learn more about it, read our recent case study: “Creating Harmony When Merging Two Companies.”

7. Performing scheduled maintenance

The goal is zero unplanned downtime. Pros in the industry know that’s not so easy to achieve. It starts with asset monitoring, including wells but also pipelines, processing facilities and other equipment to maximize operational efficiency. Scheduling downtime for maintenance ensures a shutdown, but it also ensures you’ll know when it’s coming and can plan accordingly. Unplanned failures or glitches can be costly problems at best but dangerous threats to workers at worst.

At USC Consulting Group, we’ve been working with the oil and gas industry for decades. If you’re interested in optimizing your company’s efficiency in this uncertain economy, give us a call.

How reliable is your asset maintenance program

Back to top ↑

 

Are you always putting out fires? Not in the literal sense, of course. We’re talking about operational problems that pop up at the most inconvenient times. Once you take care of one issue, two more seem to appear in its place. Issues such as:

If you’re busy troubleshooting today, it’s hard to focus on improving tomorrow. Opportunities for growth can be missed.

Get ahead of problems before they catch fire by watching this video:

At USC Consulting Group, we’ve been helping clients for over 50 years to implement strong Management Operating Systems that assist them with breaking that firefighter mentality.

The best management operating systems center around four main components:

  1. Processes
  2. Systems
  3. Roles
  4. Structures

A well-designed MOS will have your company operating like a well-oiled machine, making your bottom line stronger and your operations more efficient.

So put down the fire extinguisher and enhance your management operating system today by contacting USC Consulting Group.

Phone: +1-800-888-8872

Email: info@usccg.com

Learn more about the benefits of an effective MOS in our article How Can A Management Operating System Help Your Organization?

Back to top ↑

 

After 50+ years in the operations management consulting business, USC has become skilled detectives at finding hidden opportunities in our clients’ operations. Here’s the evidence on how we uncover more throughput and production in your operations:

The key to doing more with your existing assets is uncovering opportunities for efficiency and increased productivity. Things you might not even see that are right under your nose.

That’s where our expertise comes in. We often find them by looking at issues that are accepted in the workplace as “that’s the way we’ve always done it.”

We discover breakthroughs by asking questions.

If it’s about technology, or your assets, maybe it’s time to bring in the engineers to improve on your machines’ functions.

If it’s tactical, we analyze your processes to find areas of improvement.

Follow the footsteps in the accompanying infographic as Detective Payne points out the areas of interests you want to focus your magnifying glass on.

Uncovering Hidden Opportunities infographic

If you’d like to catch the “thief” stealing efficiency in your operations, contact us today. We’ll put our expert detective work to use for you.

Back to top ↑

 

Do you know what’s preventing your operations from being more efficient? Find the clues that will tell you where to look. The key to doing more with your existing assets is uncovering hidden opportunities for efficiency and increased productivity. Things you might not even see that are right under your nose.

That’s where USC Consulting Group’s expertise comes in. After 50+ years, we’ve become skilled detectives. Uncovering those hidden opportunities is our specialty. We often find them by looking at issues that are accepted in the workplace as “That’s the way we’ve always done it.”

We uncover hidden efficiencies by asking questions:

Detective Payne helps with uncovering hidden opportunities for efficiency and productivity

If it’s about technology, or your assets, maybe it’s time to bring in the engineers to improve on your machines’ functions.

If it’s tactical, we look at your processes to find areas of improvement.

For more on how the subject matter experts at USC Consulting Group detect inefficiencies in our clients’ operations, watch as Detective Payne points the way:

If you’d like to find more efficiency in your operations, get in touch. We’ll put our expert detective work to use for you.

#Back to top

 

What do you do when your demand is greater than your ability to meet it? This is one of the big issues some of our clients in the metals industry are facing these days as increased demand is matching or exceeding what is believed to be their capacity. Facing that situation, what can be done other than turning down sales?

Our customers who are dealing with demand management problems tend to come to us when they’re mired in what they believe is a lesser-of-two-evils choice. An option can be to increase capacity by investing in new capital assets but this involves investing millions of dollars and will demand be there given the long lead time for those assets. A possible second option is to increase capacity by expanding the hours of operation either by hiring additional staff or through overtime.  Again, this leads to an increase in costs, especially if hiring additional staff also has a lead time as employees are hired and trained. So they come to us looking for a third option: Doing more with the assets they already have.

At USC Consulting Group, that’s our wheelhouse. It’s what we’ve been doing for companies for over 50 years.

We’re not about telling our clients to throw out machinery that’s working pretty well, open their wallets, and upgrade to state-of-the-art technology. Most of the time, that’s a huge expense that’s just not necessary. Instead, we do the hard work of rolling up our sleeves and finding hidden opportunities for improvements with your current assets. It’s about doing more with what you have and overcoming demand management problems.

Hidden opportunities

What are hidden opportunities, exactly? They are efficiencies in your operation that you’re not aware of. We find them by first listening to you describe your issues, bottlenecks and stumbling blocks. Then, we look at your existing management operating system and standard work procedures like a detective, looking for ways to kick your efficiency up a notch. We find the opportunities that you may not see. Nine times out of ten, we find them by looking at issues that are generally accepted as “just the way things are.” A few examples:

We start the process of finding hidden opportunities by finding the answers to a few questions.

If it’s technical, maybe it’s time to bring in the engineers to improve on your machines’ functions. If it’s tactical, we look at your processes, the way you’re using those machines, to find those hidden efficiencies.

We also take a hard look at the feasibility of your goal. If you’re producing 900 tons per day and the demand is 1,100, can we reasonably get you there? Sometimes the answer is no. Sometimes we can split the difference and get you close to the goal. Sometimes we can hit that goal and then some.

Steel mill produces $35 million worth of improvements to uncover savings

Why frontline buy-in is essential

At times, our recommendations for new efficiencies in your time-tested processes might ruffle some feathers, especially those of your crews on the frontlines, men and women who are doing those jobs for a living. That’s why we involve them from the beginning. We don’t swoop in at the end of our process and hand them a playbook on how to do their jobs better. Instead, they help us write that playbook. Your frontline employees’ buy-in is crucial to the success of any changes you want to make.

Frankly, working with your frontline employees makes our job easier, too. They give us the lowdown on what’s happening in your operation. We hear what’s going right, and at times, what’s going wrong. They often can see what the problems are, but not know how to fix them. We can get the single source of truth from your frontlines and implement plans to fix the issues and improve productivity. It’s crucial to finding where efficiencies can happen.

To read more about how crucial frontline buy-in is to the process, read our blog, Why Getting Buy-in from Frontline Employees is Key.

At USCCG, we pride ourselves in finding hidden opportunities for efficiencies that will help smooth out bottlenecks and allow our customers to meet growing demand with their current assets. Please get in touch if you’d like to find out more.

For a deeper look at demand management problems and other challenges and how we find hidden opportunities in Metals manufacturing operations, download our free eBook: “Challenges For The Metals Industry: How USC Consulting Group Can Help

Challenges for the Metals Industry eBook

Back to top ↑

 

A proper Asset Performance Management (APM) plan ensures that your critical revenue-producing assets operate smoothly, efficiently, and at or near their rated capacity.

Asset Performance Management is the broad, systematic planning and control of a physical resource throughout its operating life. It includes the specification, design, construction, operation, maintenance, modification, and ultimately, disposal. Its principles apply to any industry with mission-critical assets, and is best implemented with support from the top-down and bottom-up. The entire organization should be involved, and supportive to ensure that it is executed properly.

Methodologies used in APM

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and Enabling Technology

A vital step in implementing an APM plan is establishing, tracking, and analyzing KPIs. This is what takes a maintenance plan from reactive to proactive. The close management of leading and lagging Key Performance Indicators helps increase the likelihood of driving measureable results without significant capital investment.

Important KPIs include:

Having the right technology tools are needed to measure and analyze this data. USC Consulting Group has helped clients optimize their existing tools or install computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS), ERP systems, and USC’s own proprietary Lean Information Control System (LINCS) to ensure that this data is used effectively.

Benefits of Asset Performance Management

In addition to increased uptime, shorter turnaround times, greater throughput and lower maintenance costs, organizations have seen improvements in their EBITDA by 15-25%.

Learn more about how APM can improve the performance of your revenue-producing assets by downloading our eBook Asset Management: The Rise of Reliability.

 

Asset Performance Management: The rise of reliability eBook

Back to top ↑

 

One of the most effective methods of analyzing operational breakdowns is to conduct a Root Cause Analysis (RCA). Some of the data needed in order to drive the analysis includes all of the unplanned failure work orders, which component required repair for each work order, and how long each work order took to complete. This analysis can be conducted on each individual piece of equipment, an entire fleet of the same type of equipment, an entire fleet of the same piece of equipment purchased in the same year, or the entire fleet as a whole. Each Computerized Maintenance Management Software (CMMS) will calculate these values in its own way. The more specific to each individual piece of equipment, the better; however, total fleet size and time constraints may not allow for each piece of equipment to be analyzed on an individual basis.

Frequency vs Severity

The objective of the RCA is to select a failure that is having a substantial impact on the equipment in question. This can either be based on frequency or severity. Frequency being the amount of times the failure occurs within a given period. Severity being the cumulative time it takes to make the repairs within a given time period. Ideally, one or more types of failures may have a high frequency and a high severity. Collecting this data alone may uncover some surprising results. For example, some quick and easy repairs that do not take long can add up very quickly if the frequency is high enough. This can come as a shock when the total time spent on this one repair is tabulated.

Take, for example, the case of the Dead Battery (Figure 2). This repair on average may only take between half an hour and an hour for a mechanic to complete, including mostly drive time and a quick battery boost. It is such a quick, straight forward solution that it may not have captured much of management’s attention. Nevertheless, when you consider how many times a dead battery has occurred in the last three months and total the hours involved in correcting this issue, it may show up as the number two consumer of the maintenance department’s human resources (mechanics labor hours). Management must be critical at this point of statements such “that’s just the work environment.” Questions need to be asked about what can be done to improve the failures that drain the greatest amount of the department’s resources.

 

Root cause analysis chart - The dead battery

 

An important element to consider is that there are always multiple root causes for any given failure. The intent of conducting the RCA is to uncover all of the individual root causes that may lead to the failure of the component in question. The true root causes are rarely uncovered at the first layer of asking “Why?” for the first time. Each answer provided must then be analyzed all over again, and this process must continue until all avenues have been explored and the group has arrived at a tangible end. It will often take five “whys” to uncover the true root cause of an issue. Once the session has uncovered all of the possible root causes of the failure in question, a solution must then be presented to address each one individually.

These solutions come in the form of action items which are reviewed at the end of the meeting by the management team, responsibility is assigned, expected completion dates are provided, and the method in which the solution will be accomplished is discussed.

After conducting a Root Cause Analysis, the management team will have a list of action items. All of which will have varying impacts on the equipment’s reliability. It is important that the management team takes the time to assess each item on two main criteria: how easy the item will be to complete and to what extent its effect is predicted to have on the equipment. Combining these two scales will provide a strong basis for prioritizing action items and deciding what to tackle first. The management team should begin with the high impact, easy to implement action items and leave the low impact, hard to implement action items for last.

RCA Action Item Generation

When considering what corrective actions can be taken in order to solve the root causes of the failure in question, keep in mind the areas or touch points where changes can be made to affect the equipment. Again, these can be simplified as:

The Operator (how the equipment is used) – Change the process in which the equipment is used. Sometimes an operator is using equipment incorrectly or in a harmful way without knowing it. Added training will often improve these issues. It is common for operators to be required to inspect all equipment before use. This usually occurs in the form of a pre-use checklist. This checklist can be modified to draw the operator’s attention to certain areas of the equipment in which wear can be seen. Noting this wear, and informing maintenance, can prevent the component from failing during use.

The Mechanic (how the equipment is repaired) – Sometimes the method in which repairs are made inside or outside of the shop will affect the way the equipment operates. If the equipment’s use is required at the time of breakdown, a mechanic may provide a “patch” to ensure it runs immediately. These “patches” however, will not always last until the next service date for the piece of equipment.

The Service (how the cyclical services are conducted) – Consider the actual activities performed on the equipment during its regular preventative maintenance service. Can these activities be changed or include more that would prevent the root cause in question? Perhaps a specific component that is failing often needs to be cleaned during the service or inspected specifically for signs of wear.

The Design (how the equipment is designed or modified) – In underground mining, equipment modifications are often required by law in North America before the equipment can even be commissioned. These modifications can vary depending on the type of underground mine. It is important to understand what impact these modifications have on the operation of the equipment. In the Dead Battery case example, maybe the equipment in question was outfitted with additional lights to make it safer to drive underground where it is pitch black. The addition of these extra lights places a larger strain on the battery and alternator. Have the battery and alternator been upgraded to keep up with this added strain as well?

These are the areas that the department has complete control over. An organization cannot control the weather, but they can understand what effects the weather has and correct them at their root. Winter brings cold temperatures; cold temperatures make it difficult for equipment to start.

The temperature cannot be changed, but where the equipment is parked can be. Can they be stored in a heated area? Could block heaters be installed at low cost? These are the kinds of questions that must be discussed in the Root Cause Analysis session with all stakeholders in the room.

Finding the root causes of operational hardships can minimize downtime and significantly boost productivity. With over 50 years of operations management experience, USC Consulting Group can troubleshoot any issues and establish preventative maintenance processes to enhance your asset management. Reach out today to learn more on how to set up an effective Root Cause Analysis.

 

How reliable is your asset maintenance program

 

Back to top ↑